VFF wins push to re-think new OJD rules | My Machinery
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VFF wins push to re-think new OJD rules

The Victorian Farmers Federation (VFF) has won the first stage of its battle to defer and amend controversial new Ovine Johne’s Disease (OJD) sheep trading rules, due to come into effect on New Year’s Day. WoolProducers Australia (WPA) and Sheepmeat Council of Australia (SCA) today announced they would review and defer the introduction of the new OJD trading rules until July 1 next year. “This is great news for sheep producers,” VFF Livestock president Ian Feldtmann said. “It gives us the time to come to a more sensible solution.” “I’d like to thank the 556 sheep producers who signed our petition opposing the new rules and all those who attended our OJD forums. As they say it’s a victory for common sense. “We also appreciate Victorian Agriculture Minister Peter Walsh’s support.” As they stood the new rules would have meant Victorian sheep producers could no longer gain access to South Australia and other “protected” areas by claiming credit for vaccinating their flocks against OJD. “It would have meant Victorian sheep producers would have to prove their flocks had tested negative to OJD, if they want to trade into South Australia and other regions with a low prevalence of the disease that had been declared ‘protected’,” Mr Feldtmann said The VFF argued the new rules would not only have undermined the value of vaccination, but left producers struggling to get test results back on their flocks by January 1. In a statement released today Wool Producers and Sheepmeat Council stated: “there have been many issues raised over the past weeks and a high level of concern about the proposed program.” “These need to be considered, particularly the lack of recognition for vaccinates, and WPA and SCA are considering how these might be addressed,” both councils stated. “The six month extension provides time for these concerns to be considered. Both councils are committed to implementing a practical and technically sound plan to reduce the spread of OJD.”

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