Prime location for prime lamb | My Machinery
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Prime location for prime lamb

Celebrity endorsements and widespread media coverage was not what Scott Herde expected when he steered away from what five generations of family had always done. But Spear Creek Dorper Lamb has attracted just that and it all comes down to an exceptional product and the perfect location. Just 20 minutes from Port Augusta, nestled on the bottom of the Flinders Ranges, lies Scott’s sheep station. While it has enjoyed good rain in recent years, it was in 2006 as the drought dragged on he knew he had to do something to ensure the survival of the station. His family had always grown Merino sheep, but the markets weren’t doing so well so he trialled 100 first-cross Dorper ewes. Since then he has never looked back, now processing between 320 and 360 lambs every week. The lamb can be found in restaurants and butchers across South Australia, Northern Territory and in Melbourne. The native saltbush and pasture combined with the low stress environment – dorpers do not need to be shorn, crutched or mulesed and no chemicals are used – means the lamb is of exceptional quality. This hasn’t gone unnoticed with “Australia’s Lambassador” Sam Kekovich endorsing Spear Creek Dorper Lamb, celebrity chef Poh Ling Yeow filming her show Poh’s Kitchen on the property and restaurants such as the Stag Hotel on Rundle Street, Adelaide featuring the lamb on their menus. There are also the media reports about how Spear Creek Dorper Lamb out-performed supermarket cuts in a meat yield trial and the lamb has won medals at the Sydney Fine Food Show for two years running. Organically grown and processed, Scott explained the lambs are marked and weaned every eight weeks and then they spend another eight weeks in the paddock before they are sold. “Having that young, fresh lamb dressing out at 20 to 24 kilos at five to six months of age gives you a really nice, tender product that’s really juicy and that you can sell anywhere,” he said. Each lamb is graded before being sent off the property, making sure each is the right weight, shape and fat score. But without the station’s location, on the edge of the Flinders Ranges, so close to Port Augusta, Scott would not have such a prime product to sell. “Having the right kind of climate (is important),” he said. “We do not have any frosts or severe winter weather,” he said. “This is probably some of the best sheep country in Australia right here because we have nice mild climate and we have got these native pastures suited to the breed. “Port Augusta has so much infrastructure to support what we are doing. “We have the highways and the markets to support us and we have got all the services for the business and there’s ample staff available.”

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