Safeguarding grain production for 2013 | My Machinery
CASE Agriculture
Safeguarding grain production for 2013

As grain growers get into gear for the 2013 cropping season, they have been advised to safeguard their future with an on-farm biosecurity plan. Department of Primary Industries (DPI) grain biosecurity officer, Louise Rossiter, said this is an ideal time to integrate protection plans into their cropping program, which will help defend valuable farming enterprises from unwanted pests, weeds and diseases. “Many people look at biosecurity as something that happens at the border to keep pests out of Australia, but farmers have most control at their farm gate when it comes to keeping out undesirable incursions,” Dr Rossiter said. “A simple biosecurity plan which involves identifying possible risks and how they can be best managed can save time and money for grain growers,” Dr Rossiter said. “Unwanted weeds can be brought in with seed and grain – buying certified grain or dealing with trusted sources can greatly reduce the risk. “Farm visitors, contractors and vehicles can also introduce and spread weeds, pests and diseases – a ‘come clean, go clean’ policy can help address that risk.” Dr Rossiter said farmers could support a ‘come clean, go clean’ initiative with the appropriate farm infrastructure. “A basic wash down area can be used to reduce the risk and designated parking areas can be easily inspected to help ensure no new weeds are introduced and allowed to spread undetected,” she said. “A simple biosecurity sign with contact details located at the property entrance, farm office or a central meeting point can help manage visitors to the farm. “Once risks and ways of managing them have been identified it is important to ensure that you have a plan for implementation.” Dr Rossiter advised growers to start with the greatest risks and the most easily implemented management actions. “In time other measures can be introduced and built into the plan, which will allow gradual and continual improvement in protecting your farm.”

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